Indian affairs and their administration
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Indian affairs and their administration with special reference to the far West, 1849-1860 by Alban W. Hoopes

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Published by University of Pennsylvania Press, H. Milford, Oxford University Press in Philadelphia, London .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • West (U.S.)

Subjects:

  • Indians of North America -- Government relations.,
  • Indians of North America -- West (U.S.)

Book details:

Edition Notes

Statementby Alban W. Hoopes.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsE93 .H76
The Physical Object
Paginationix, 264 p.
Number of Pages264
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL6286560M
LC Control Number33005636
OCLC/WorldCa2176737

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